Indian Journal of Public Health

AUTHORíS REPLY
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 70-

Author’s reply for article “nomophobic behaviors among smartphone using medical and engineering students in two colleges of West Bengal”


Pallabi Dasgupta1, Sharmistha Bhattacherjee2, Samir Dasgupta3, Jayanta Kumar Roy2, Abhijit Mukherjee2, Romy Biswas4,  
1 Medical Officer (Specialist), Department of Community Medicine, Malda Medical College, Malda, West Bengal, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, North Bengal Medical College, Siliguri, West Bengal, India
3 Professor and Head, Department of Community Medicine, North Bengal Medical College, Siliguri, West Bengal, India
4 Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, North Bengal Medical College, Siliguri, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Pallabi Dasgupta
Department of Community Medicine, Malda Medical College, English Bazar, Malda - 732 101, West Bengal
India




How to cite this article:
Dasgupta P, Bhattacherjee S, Dasgupta S, Roy JK, Mukherjee A, Biswas R. Author’s reply for article “nomophobic behaviors among smartphone using medical and engineering students in two colleges of West Bengal”.Indian J Public Health 2018;62:70-70


How to cite this URL:
Dasgupta P, Bhattacherjee S, Dasgupta S, Roy JK, Mukherjee A, Biswas R. Author’s reply for article “nomophobic behaviors among smartphone using medical and engineering students in two colleges of West Bengal”. Indian J Public Health [serial online] 2018 [cited 2020 Oct 30 ];62:70-70
Available from: https://www.ijph.in/text.asp?2018/62/1/70/226626


Full Text



Sir,

We appreciate that the readers have taken great interest in our topic of research.[1] It would be beneficial for all of us to clarify some aspects of the methodology in a point-wise manner.

The Nomophobia Questionnaire (NMP-Q) developed by Yildirim and Correia[2] did not mention any specific cutoff for classifying nomophobia. Using Likert’s scale, the higher scores indicated more toward the nomophobic spectrum. We used two-step cluster analysis incorporating all the individual items of NMP-Q. Hence, based on the responses of the participants, the group with higher mean scores in Cluster analysis indicated the nomophobic groupThe readers have indeed raised a valid point. Our objective was to compare nomophobic behaviors of smartphone-using students in the two colleges, which might not, in general, represent the picture of other colleges in West Bengal or India. It might be that some facilities are also available in other mobiles, but it is inclusive in smartphones as well. As it is a validated questionnaire, used in a similar group of participants, questions were not omitted. Both the colleges had in campus Wi-Fi connectivity free of cost. Both the colleges were government institutions. Although it was not assessed, it can be assumed that students belonged to similar socioeconomic background. Moreover, booking cabs using digital platform was not the norms in the area. These intricate qualitative issues were beyond the purview of our studyWe agree to the point raised by the readers. The purpose of smartphone or gadgets usage might vary. In that case, gadgets over usage or technophobia could be explored like other authors[3],[4]We have tried to introduce the topic at first in our discussion. Within limitations of our study, we have explored few aspects of this emerging problem. Further researches could be done for in-depth exploration of the issue.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Dasgupta P, Bhattacherjee S, Dasgupta S, Roy JK, Mukherjee A, Biswas R, et al. Nomophobic behaviors among smartphone using medical and engineering students in two colleges of West Bengal. Indian J Public Health 2017;61:199-204.
2Yildirim C, Correia AP. Exploring the dimensions of nomophobia: Development and validation of a self-reported questionnaire. Comput Hum Behav 2015;49:130-7.
3Weil MM, Rosen LD. The psychological impact of technology from a global perspective: A study of technological sophistication and technophobia in university students from twenty-three countries. Comput Hum Behav 1995;11:95-133.
4David G, Lee-Kelley L, Barton M. Technophobia, gender influences and consumer decision-making for technology-related products. Eur J Innov Manag 2003;6:253-63.