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BRIEF RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 398-401

Retinopathy of prematurity in a level II neonatal care unit of a district of West Bengal: A retrospective analysis of 5 years


1 Professor, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Neonatology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
3 Consultant, Department of Ophthalmology, Calcutta Medical Research Institute, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
4 Clinical Tutor, Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
5 Medical Officer in-Charge, Special Newborn Care Unit, MR Bangur Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Anindya Kumar Saha
Department of Neonatology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, 244, A.J.C Bose Road, Kolkata - 700 020, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijph.IJPH_336_19

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Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), particularly severe ROP is a health concern. The study is aimed to ascertain the magnitude, profile, and outcome of ROP over 5 years at a level II neonatal unit in a district of West Bengal. From 2012 to 2016, a total of 691 newborns with birth weight (BW) <2000 g and/or gestational age < 35 weeks of a district level II neonatal care unit were screened for ROP. Retrospective analysis of these screened babies was performed using the principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. Overall, 38.5% of newborns had any stage ROP and13.2% severe ROP. Two-thirds of babies with severe ROP were <1250 g of BW. About 16.2% of the ROP cases suffered from aggressive posterior ROP (APROP). Oxygen and prematurity were found as significant risk factors. Substantially high occurrence of severe ROP and APROP warrants appropriate measures. Timely screening and intervention with referral to the neonatal ROP unit can improve the scenario.


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