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   2010| April-June  | Volume 54 | Issue 2  
    Online since November 27, 2010

 
 
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DR. B. C. DAS GUPTA MEMORIAL ORATION
Reducing maternal mortality in India: Policy, equity, and quality issues
Satish Kumar
April-June 2010, 54(2):57-64
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73271  PMID:21119236
  8 10,687 1,306
PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION
Need and opportunities for health management education in India
Kavya Sharma, Sanjay Zodpey
April-June 2010, 54(2):84-91
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73276  PMID:21119241
Public Health Management has taken a momentous leap and seeks to provide a plausible answer to many issues related to public health. A key area identified to aid the public health objectives in the country is human resource management. The country faces a dire crunch in the available work force in almost all the healthcare network. Countering the current health situation in the country, various institutes have come up offering specialized courses in public health management. The wide gap between supply and demand for trained health care managers/ administrators to work for hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, health insurance and third party administration and other health care provider organizations needs attention. The paper is a situational analysis of all such courses offered pan India. A systematic, predefined approach was used to collect and assemble the data. All the institutes offering such courses were contacted for detailed information. Fifty one institutes have been identified which annually produce around 2122 qualified professional to work in the domain of public health management. The paper also discusses the demand analysis where these prospective students can be placed. An estimated 19,930 professionals would be required based upon the country's present status, which reflects the dearth in their workforce capacity. The paper also enlightens the scope of strengthening the existing system, by effectively training the existing workforce for their capacity building, and highlights training opportunities for working professional to pursue a related academic program.
  6 3,130 509
DR. S. D. GAUR BEST PAPER AWARD ON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Association of air pollution and mortality in the Ludhiana city of India: A time-series study
Rajesh Kumar, Suresh K Sharma, JS Thakur, P.V.M. Lakshmi, MK Sharma, T Singh
April-June 2010, 54(2):98-103
PMID:21119243
Background : With rapid industrialization, the quality of the air is being compromised in several Indian cities. Hence, the effect of air pollution on mortality was studied in the Ludhiana city of Punjab in northern India. Materials and Methods: Air quality and meteorological and mortality data were obtained for 2002-2004. Punjab Pollution Control Board monitored air quality on specific week days at different sites. Respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) (equivalent of PM 10 ) was measured by the gravimetric method and NOx and SO 2 by chemical method. The estimation of the daily average RSPM level was attempted by combining 24-h average of the monitoring stations working on a particular day. Sahnewal Airport records temperature, dew point, and relative humidity at 8.30 am, 11.30 am, and 5.30 pm. Visibility of fixed landmarks is observed manually every hour from 6.30 am to 6.30 pm. Daily death records were obtained from the civil registration system. The association between visibility as proxy for RSPM and mortality was established using the generalized additive model (GAM) with natural spline smoothers at 6, 3, 3 df in R software with deaths (excluding accidents) as a dependent variable. Smoothers for day of the week, temperature, and relative humidity were also included in the model. Results: Air quality monitoring days for different monitoring stations ranged from 86 to 138 per year. The annual mean RSPM ranged from 226.7 to 269 μg/m 3 , SO 2 from 11.6 to 20.9 μg/m 3 , and NOx from 32.2 to 46.3 μg/m 3 . The mean (SD) temperature was 25.6 (7.9)°C, relative humidity was 58.1 (19.3)%, and visibility was 3398 (1418) m. Overall 28,007 deaths were registered, with an average of 25.4 deaths (SD 5.8) per day. The association between air quality as indicated by visibility (haze) and daily mortality was found to be statistically significant. For every 1 km decrease in visibility at midday, mortality due to natural causes increased by 2.4%. Conclusions: In Ludhiana, air pollution levels were quite high. The air quality (as measured by visibility) was significantly associated with mortality.
  4 3,977 496
DR. J. E. PARK MEMORIAL ORATION
Time to revamp the universal immunization program in India
SK Pradhan
April-June 2010, 54(2):71-74
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73273  PMID:21119238
  3 2,974 466
DR. J. K. SEHGAL MEMORIAL ORATION
Strategic issues in child health
CP Mishra
April-June 2010, 54(2):75-80
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73274  PMID:21119239
  3 3,845 427
DR. P.C. SEN MEMORIAL AWARD PAPER ON RURAL HEALTH PRACTICE
Enduring starvation in silent Population: A study on prevalence and factors contributing to household food security in the tribal population in Bankura, West Bengal
Dipta Kanti Mukhopadhyay, Sujishnu Mukhopadhyay, Akhil Bandhu Biswas
April-June 2010, 54(2):92-97
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73277  PMID:21119242
Background : Strengthening food security enhancement intervention should be based on the assessment of household food security and its correlates. Objectives: The objective was to find out the prevalence and factors contributing to household food security in a tribal population in Bankura. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 267 tribal households in Bankura-I CD Block selected through cluster random sampling. Household food security was assessed using a validated Bengali version of Household Food Security Scale-Short Form along with the collection of information regarding the monthly per capita expenditure (MPCE), total to earning member ratio, BPL card holding, utilization of the public distribution system (PDS) and receipt of any social assistance through a house-to-house survey. Result and Conclusion: Overall, 47.2% of study households were food secure whereas 29.6% and 23.2% were low and very low food secure, respectively. MPCE ≥ Rs. 356, total to earning member ratio ≤ 4:1, regular utilization of PDS, and nonholding of the BPL card were significantly related with household food security.
  3 2,320 390
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Study of attitude regarding health care waste management among health care providers of a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata
Dipankar Chattopadhyay, Sukamal Bisoi, Biswajit Biswas, Sita Chattopadhyay
April-June 2010, 54(2):104-105
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73279  PMID:21119244
  3 2,653 462
DR. K. N. RAO MEMORIAL ORATION
Health and spirituality: An attempt to understand the scope
B Swarajyalakshmi
April-June 2010, 54(2):65-70
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73272  PMID:21119237
  2 6,048 354
DR. G. ANJANEYALU ORATION
Radical changes in public health - Need of the hour
T.S.R. Sai, Kunal Kanti Majumdar
April-June 2010, 54(2):81-83
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73275  PMID:21119240
  - 1,201 252
EDITORIAL
Can primary health care reinvent itself to impact health care utilization?
Sanjay Zodpey
April-June 2010, 54(2):55-56
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73270  PMID:21119235
  - 1,605 351
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
On, "Coverage of ante-natal care in a block of West Bengal using lot quality assurance sampling"
Dipak Pal, Suprakas Hazra
April-June 2010, 54(2):105-106
DOI:10.4103/0019-557X.73280  PMID:21119245
  - 1,004 209
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