Indian Journal of Public Health

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 54--59

Tobacco use among young adolescents in Myanmar: Findings from global youth tobacco survey


Nyein Aye Tun1, Thuzar Chittin2, Naveen Agarwal3, Mya Lay New4, Yamin Thaung1, Pyi Pyi Phyo5 
1 Assistant Director, Basic Health Service Section, Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health and Sports, Myanmar
2 Deputy Director General (Training), Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health and Sports, Myanmar
3 Surveillance Management Associate, Noncommunicable Disease and Tobacco Surveillance, Department of Noncommunicable Diseases and Environmental Health, World Health Organization, Regional Office for South East Asia, New Delhi, India
4 Deputy Director, Basic Health Service Section, Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health and Sports, Myanmar
5 Health Impact Assessment Coordinator, (Consultant), Asian Development Bank, Myanmar

Correspondence Address:
Naveen Agarwal
Noncommunicable Disease and Tobacco Surveillance, Department of Noncommunicable Diseases and Environmental Health, World Health Organization, Regional Office for South East Asia, New Delhi
India

Background: Tobacco consumption among youths poses significant public health problem in developing countries. This study utilized the available data of Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) to assess the prevalence of tobacco use among Myanmar adolescents. Objectives: We have conducted the fourth round of the GYTS in Myanmar during 2016 to monitor trends in tobacco use. Methods: We have selected 51 schools using random sampling based on probability proportional to school enrollment. In each school, we selected grades 9–11 by random sampling. All students in these classes completed a self-administered standard questionnaire. Results: A total of 3633 students who were participated in the survey 2621 students were 13–15 year. Overall 13.6% of students currently used tobacco; boys 26.3% and girls 3.7%. The prevalence of current cigarette smoking was 8.3%; boys 17.0%, girls 1.5%, whereas 5.7% of students currently smokeless tobacco users; boys 11.0%, girls 1.5%. Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at home, in enclosed public places, and school was reported by 33.2%, 28.4%, and 64.5%, respectively. More than four out of 5 (83.4%) students had noticed someone using tobacco on television, videos or movies, and 42.3% had noticed tobacco advertising at points of sale. Among current smokers, 62.9% were not refused by purchasing cigarettes because of their minor age. Conclusion: Myanmar has higher prevalence of tobacco use among students, especially among boys. The study provides evidence-based information for developing comprehensive tobacco control programs – both education and policy interventions to reduce smoking rate among young people in Myanmar.


How to cite this article:
Tun NA, Chittin T, Agarwal N, New ML, Thaung Y, Phyo PP. Tobacco use among young adolescents in Myanmar: Findings from global youth tobacco survey.Indian J Public Health 2017;61:54-59


How to cite this URL:
Tun NA, Chittin T, Agarwal N, New ML, Thaung Y, Phyo PP. Tobacco use among young adolescents in Myanmar: Findings from global youth tobacco survey. Indian J Public Health [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 8 ];61:54-59
Available from: http://www.ijph.in/article.asp?issn=0019-557X;year=2017;volume=61;issue=5;spage=54;epage=59;aulast=Tun;type=0