Indian Journal of Public Health

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 248--253

Utilization of safe drinking water and sanitary facilities in slum households of Siliguri, West Bengal


Ditipriya Bhar1, Sharmistha Bhattacherjee2, Abhijit Mukherjee2, Tapas Kumar Sarkar3, Samir Dasgupta5 
1 Senior Resident, Department of Community and Family Medicine, All Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, North Bengal Medical College, Sushrutanagar, Darjeeling, West Bengal, India
3 Demonstrator, Department of Community Medicine, North Bengal Medical College, Sushrutanagar, Darjeeling, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Sharmistha Bhattacherjee
Department of Community Medicine, North Bengal Medical College, Sushrutanagar, Darjeeling - 734 012, West Bengal
India

Background: With the rapid expansion of urban population, provision of safe water and basic sanitation is becoming a challenge; especially in slums. This is adversely affecting the health of the people living in such areas. Objectives: The study was conducted to measure the proportion of households using improved drinking water and sanitation facilities and to determine the association between diarrhea in under-five children with water and sanitation facilities. Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted among 796 slum households in Siliguri from January to March 2016 by interviewing one member from each household using a predesigned and pretested questionnaire based on the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Program Core questions on drinking water and sanitation for household surveys. Results: A majority 733 (92.1%) of slum households used an improved drinking water source; 565 (71%) used public tap. About two-thirds (65.7%) household used improved sanitation facilities. About 15.8% households had reported diarrheal events in children in the previous month. Unimproved drinking water sources (AOR = 4.13; 1.91, 8.96), houses without piped water supply (AOR = 4.43; 1.31, 15.00), and latrines located outside houses (AOR = 3.61; 1.44, 9.07) were significantly associated with the diarrheal events in children. Conclusion: The utilization of improved drinking water source was high but piped water connection and improved sanitary toilet used was low. Association between diarrheal events and type of drinking water sources and place of sanitation might suggest fecal contamination of water sources. Awareness generation through family-centered educational programs could improve the situation.


How to cite this article:
Bhar D, Bhattacherjee S, Mukherjee A, Sarkar TK, Dasgupta S. Utilization of safe drinking water and sanitary facilities in slum households of Siliguri, West Bengal.Indian J Public Health 2017;61:248-253


How to cite this URL:
Bhar D, Bhattacherjee S, Mukherjee A, Sarkar TK, Dasgupta S. Utilization of safe drinking water and sanitary facilities in slum households of Siliguri, West Bengal. Indian J Public Health [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Sep 30 ];61:248-253
Available from: http://www.ijph.in/article.asp?issn=0019-557X;year=2017;volume=61;issue=4;spage=248;epage=253;aulast=Bhar;type=0