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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 141-147

Frequency, intensity, time, and type principle of physical activity as a medical disability prevention program in ethiopia: a mixed-method study


1 Postdoc Researcher, College of Health Science, Department of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
2 Associate Professor, College of Health Science, Department of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

Correspondence Address:
M D Kassa
College of Health Science, Department of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban
South Africa
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijph.IJPH_418_18

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Background: Despite the recognized benefits of physical activity (PA), the extent of its recognition and applications as a medical disability (MD) prevention program by practitioners working in Ethiopian health-care settings is unknown. Objective: The objective of the study was to explore health-care professionals' knowledge base and characteristics on the utilization of the frequency, intensity, time (duration), and type principle (FITT) of PA as an MD prevention program in the Ethiopian public health-care system.Methods: A mixed-method research design was used with data collected from 13 public referral hospitals in Ethiopia. In Phase I, quantitative data were collected from 312 health professionals (99 physicians and 213 nurses) using a survey. In Phase II, qualitative data were collected by interviewing health officers (n = 13 physician–hospital managers) and conducting one focus group discussion (n = 6 national health bureau officers). Results: A quarter (28%) of practitioners working in referral hospitals are using PA as an MD prevention program. Higher specialization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 20.203, P < 0.001), many service years (AOR = 0.041, P = 0.014), young age (AOR = 19.871, P < 0.001), and being male (AOR = 0.269, P < 0.001) were associated with using PA as a MDs prevention program. Conclusion: Applying the FITT principle of PA for the prevention of MD among practitioners was very poor. Training of health-care professionals to use PA as a program for MDs prevention is required at the undergraduate level as well as specialized courses on qualification.


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