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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 60  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 34-39

Is mother and child tracking system (MCTS) on the right track? An experience from a northern state of India


1 PhD Scholar, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, The Union South East Asia Office, New Delhi, India
2 Operational Research Fellow, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, The Union South East Asia Office, New Delhi, India
3 Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sonu Goel
School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012, Punjab and Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-557X.177298

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Background: Effective monitoring and supervision of health care programs depend on complete, accurate, and timely flow of data. Mother and Child Tracking System (MCTS) is a centralized information technology (IT)-based application launched in 2009 for improving the delivery of maternal and child health care services through name-based tracking. There is minimal evidence in the literature evaluating the operational aspects of such a name-based tracking system even after 5 years of its implementation. Objective: The present study was thus conducted to understand the opportunities and challenges in the operationalization of MCTS strategy in a district in Haryana and to understand the stakeholder's perspectives. Materials and Methods: Performance of Routine Information System Management (PRISM) framework was used. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Shahzadpur block of Ambala district, Haryana, India involving in-depth interviews of health care providers and clients in 12 subcenters (SCs) and two primary health centers (PHCs). Results: Lack of appropriate training, overburdened data entry operator (DEO) and auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM), poor Internet connectivity, slow server speed, and frequent power failures were revealed as major limitations for the effective implementation of MCTS. Nearly 18% of the clients reported receiving short message service (SMS) and only 6% could understand the SMS. Conclusion: MCTS has led to accountability and improved supervision of health workers, apart from empowering the community.


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