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BRIEF RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 141-144

Clinical profile of hand, foot, and mouth disease and its associated complications among children in Shimoga City, southern Karnataka: A hospital-based study


1 Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Purle, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Raja Rajeshwari Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Assistant Professor, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Purle, India
4 Senior Resident, Department of Pediatrics, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Purle, India
5 Department of Pediatrics, Honorary Assistant Professor, Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Vikram S Kumar
Department of Pediatrics, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Purle, HH Road, Shimoga - 577 222, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-557X.157536

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Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is one of the important public health problems. It has become a common childhood illness in our part of the country. In most instances, this is a mild self-limiting illness. The affected children are often given outpatient care. However, over the last decade, HFMD has emerged as a growing health problem in Asian countries following frequent outbreaks of deaths associated with HFMD caused by a more virulent member of human enterovirus (HEV), namely, HEV71. A hospital-based descriptive study about the clinical presentations and complications of HFMD at the hospitals of Shimoga city between March 2013 and August 2013 is documented and presented here. HFMD was more common in the 1-3-year old age group, with aseptic meningitis being the most common complication. Surveillance of HFMD must be maintained as there is no effective chemoprophylaxis or vaccine available.


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