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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 58  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 22-26

Effect of very early skin to skin contact on success at breastfeeding and preventing early hypothermia in neonates


1 Clinical Assistant, Department of Pediatrics, Fortis Escorts Hospital and Research Centre, Faridabad, Haryana, India
2 Consultant, Department of Pediatrics, Fortis Escorts Hospital and Research Centre, Faridabad, Haryana, India

Correspondence Address:
Smita Srivastava
Flat No. 100, Parvana Apartments, Sector 21 D, Faridabad - 121 001, Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-557X.128160

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Context: Birth and immediate postpartum period pose many challenges for the newborn. The neonatal mortality rates are high in India, whereas the breastfeeding rates are still low. Hence, need exists for a simple and easily applicable intervention, which may counter these challenges. Aims: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of very early skin-to-skin contact (SSC), in term babies with their mothers, on success of breastfeeding and neonatal well-being. Settings and Design: Randomized control trial conducted over 2 years' period in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Healthy babies delivered normally were included. Very early SSC between mothers and their newborns was initiated in the study group. We studied effective suckling (using modified infant breastfeeding assessment tool [IBFAT]), breastfeeding status at 6 weeks, maternal satisfaction, thermal regulation, baby's weight and morbidity. Statistical Analysis: T-test, Pearson Chi-square test and non-parametric Mann-Whitney test were used through relevant Windows SPSS software version 16.0. Results: We observed that SSC contributed to better suckling competence as measured by IBFAT score (P < 0.0001). More babies in the SSC group were exclusively breastfed at first follow-up visit (P = 0.002) and at 6 weeks (P < 0.0001). SSC led to higher maternal satisfaction rates, better temperature gain in immediate post-partum period, lesser weight loss was at discharge and at first follow-up (all P < 0.0001) and lesser morbidity than the study group (P = 0.006). Conclusion: Very early SSC is an effective intervention that improves baby's suckling competence, maternal satisfaction, breastfeeding rates and temperature control and weight patterns.


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