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BRIEF RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 57  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 276-279

Use of insecticide-treated bednets in an urban coastal area of Puducherry, India: A cross-sectional study


1 Junior Resident, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
3 Junior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, AIIMS, New Delhi, India
4 Junior Resident, Department of Surgery, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India
5 Junior Resident, Department of Pediatrics, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Suman Saurabh
Junior Resident, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, 4th Floor, Administrative Block, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry - 605 006
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-557X.123269

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Use of Insecticide-Treated Bednets (ITNs) has been shown to reduce the incidence of mosquito-borne diseases. However, the impact of ITNs depends on its community acceptance. We studied the ITN usage and factors influencing it, following the distribution of one ITN to each family in an urban area of Puducherry. Around 93.6% of the 157 respondents surveyed were aware of mosquito-borne diseases. Coils and vaporizers were used in 91.1% of the families. Around two-fifths (41.3%) of the 116 families who received the ITNs used it regularly with another 5.1% using it irregularly. Majority of the users (85%) reported reduced mosquito bites and pleasant sleep after use. Small size of ITNs was the most common reason for non-use (46.3%). Families not using normal bed nets at the time of distribution of ITNs were unlikely to use ITNs at present (odds ratio = 5.22, P < 0.001). Therefore, ITN size should be increased and distribution in urban settings should accompany behavior change communication.


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