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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 56  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 169-170  

Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in schoolgoing children


1 Professor, Department of Microbiology, Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 PG Student, Department of Microbiology, Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication21-Aug-2012

Correspondence Address:
Sai Leela Kondapaneni
Professor, Department of Microbiology, Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Narketpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh - 508254
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-557X.99925

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How to cite this article:
Kondapaneni SL, Surpam R, Mohd Azaruddin, Devi G. Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in schoolgoing children. Indian J Public Health 2012;56:169-70

How to cite this URL:
Kondapaneni SL, Surpam R, Mohd Azaruddin, Devi G. Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in schoolgoing children. Indian J Public Health [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Jun 26];56:169-70. Available from: http://www.ijph.in/text.asp?2012/56/2/169/99925

Sir,

Asymptomatic bacteriuria means the presence of significant number of bacteria in the urine of asymptomatic people. Infection with symptoms will alert a person to take treatment in time to prevent further complications. But in case of asymptomatic persons, they may come to hospital with complications. Early detection of infection in asymptomatic children can prevent pyelonephritis and renal damage. The present study was undertaken to screen for asymptomatic bacteriuria in school-going children of different age and gender groups by a simple and economic screening procedure, and to isolate the organisms responsible for asymptomatic bacteriuria in early stage to prevent the complications by giving early treatment.

A total of 200 school children 11-15 years of age from different schools in Narketpally, Nalgonda District in Andhra Pradesh were screened. The students suffering from urinary tract infection were not considered for the present analysis. The study group comprised 140 girls and 60 boys. None of the students in the study group is having anatomic abnormality in urinary tract. As the collection of urine sample from the children was difficult, the instruction to the parents for the collection of midstream urine sample was distributed to the children along with sterile wide mouth bottles. A clean catch midstream urine samples collected from all children were transported to the laboratory within half an hour. In the laboratory the specimens were examined microscopically for the presence of pus cells, red blood cells, and epithelial cells. A standard calibrated loop technique was used to place 0.01 mL of urine on MacConkey agar and Blood agar media, after overnight incubation to quantify the organisms. Colony count of >10 5 /mL of colony-forming units were read as significant growth and antimicrobial testing was done according to Kirby-Bauer method for significant pathogens. To rule out the possible contamination with the fecal matter, all positive samples were rechecked by collecting the second urine sample from them.

Out of the 200 children, 33 (16.5%) showed significant bacteriuria with female preponderance over male. The prominent isolates were  Escherichia More Details coli 09 (27.27%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 08 (24.24%), Proteus spp. 07 (21.21%), Staphylococcus aureus 05 (15%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 04 (12%). Treatment was given based on sensitivity pattern. Significant bacteriuria was seen in school children of low socioeconomic background and poor hygiene (16%) compared with those from high socioeconomic background and good hygiene (0.5%). Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria as observed in the present study is more when compared with the previous studies, [1],[2],[3] but consistent with the findings of female preponderance. The organisms most frequently isolated in asymptomatic bacteriuria include species of Enterobacteriaceae family, especially E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. [1],[2],[3]

Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in school-going children helps to know the prevalence, and appropriate measures can be taken to prevent later complications. Girls with bacteriuria have more recurrent infection and early detection of infection and treatment with antibiotics can prevent pyelonephritis and renal damage in childhood. [4] Bringing the awareness about hygiene can prevent the ascending urinary tract infection.

 
   References Top

1.Kumar CS, Jairam A, Chetan S, Sudesh P, Kapur I; Srikaramllya. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in school going children. Indian J Med Microbiol 2002;20:29-32.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.Jha BK, Singh Y. Prevalence of Asymptomatic bacteriuria in school going children in Pokhara valley. Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ) 2007;5:81-4.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Badami PV, Deodhar LP. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in school children. J Postgrad Med 1976;22:130-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
4.Hansson S, Jobel U, Noren L, Bjure J. Untreated bacteriuria in asymptomatic girls with renal scanning. Pediatrics 1989;84:964-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    



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