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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 309-312

Provocative poliomyelitis causing postpolio residual paralysis among select communities of two remote villages of North Karnataka in India: A community survey


1 Associate Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India
2 Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India
3 Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India
4 PG Student, Department of Pediatrics, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
Amitesh Narayan
Associate Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Centre of Basic Sciences, Bejai, Mangalore - 575 004
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-557X.92412

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Intramuscular injections can provoke muscular paralysis especially, if the child has had exposure to polio virus. The purpose of the study was to determine the association with known risk factors for motor disabilities in two remote villages of North Karnataka (India), where an increased number of disabled people among select communities had been reported. A community based survey was conducted. The selection of study subjects was done through screening, history related with occurrence of musculoskeletal disability, screening and general examination of the affected joints and muscles. Data analysis was done by estimation of percentages. Among the physical disabilities identified, the most common was post-polio residual paralysis. 35.65% (n = 41) subjects had developed paralysis following the administration of an intramuscular injection when they had acute viremia in childhood, indicating that (probably) muscle paralysis would have been provoked by intramuscular injections, resulting in provocative poliomyelitis. Unnecessary injection must be avoided in children during acute viremia state and use of oral polio vaccine should be encouraged.


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