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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 207-209

Prevalence and pattern of childhood morbidity in a tribal area of maharastra


1 Post-Graduate Student, Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
2 Associate Professor, Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
3 Professor, Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
4 Lecturer in Statistics, Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
5 Professor and Head, Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
V C Giri
Post-Graduate Student, Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 19189823

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Previous studies have demonstrated that tribal children suffer from a higher rate of morbidity. Gender discrimination in the form of dietary neglect of the female children has also been noted. The community based cross-sectional study was carried out in tribal PHC Salona of Chikhaldara Block, Amaravati District, Maharashtra to study the prevalence and pattern of morbidities in children. 2603 study children between 0-72 months of age were covered in a house to house survey by the investigator. Parents of eligible children were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire for socio-demographic details, personal habits, past and current medical history. The prevalence of overall morbidities was 34.7% and it was higher in female as compared to male children (34.8% vs. 29.7%; χ2 = 9.3, p < 0.005). Among individual morbidities, the prevalence of acute respiratory infections was the highest (25.5%) followed by acute diarrhoeal diseases (5.8%), conjunctivitis (1.5%), and skin infections (1.2%).


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