Users Online: 820 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 

 

Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
     
Year : 1994  |  Volume : 38  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 77-80

Maternal behaviour and feeding practices as determinants of childhood diarrhoea : some observations amongst rural Bengalee mothers.


Division of Epidemiology, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta

Correspondence Address:
S Ghosh
Division of Epidemiology, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Calcutta

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 7836002

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

In India, epidemiologists followed 980 rural families with children less than 3 years old living near Calcutta in West Bengal to identify determinants related to maternal behavior and feeding practices of childhood diarrhea. They identified 570 families with diarrhea cases and 410 families with no diarrhea cases. Children with diarrhea were more likely to live in Kuchcha housing (44.7% vs. 33.9%; p = 0.0006), to have a family income of less than Rs.500/month (44.2% vs. 36.6%; p = 0.016) and a mother who was illiterate (53.5% vs. 45.4%; p = 0.013). Nondiarrheal families were more likely to have a sanitary latrine (63.9% vs. 50.5%; p = 0.000031) and have soap (for ablution, 22.9% vs. 14.4%; p = 0.0005 and, before food handling, 7.1% vs. 3%; p = 0.0046). Mothers with children who did not have diarrhea were more likely to space their births at least 4 years apart than those with children who did have diarrhea (20.5% vs. 14.7%; p = 0.018). Mothers with children who did not have diarrhea were also less likely to practice poor hygiene. Specifically, they would tend not to use leftover food for the next feeding (19.1% vs. 38%; p = 0.02), to have children whose body and clothes were dirty (19.1% vs. 40%; p = 0.01), to dispose of stools indiscriminately (55.3% vs. 73.7%; p = 0.02), to share a common latrine with other villagers (15.9% vs. 36.2%; p = 0.008), and to stop drinking water in a wide mouth container (66% vs. 84.8%; p = 0.008). Mothers with children who did not have diarrhea were also more likely to wash the container used for feeding the children with soap (48.9% vs. 30.4%; p = 0.03).


[PDF Not available]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed272    
    Printed18    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal